AD/AS Posters

ECON: Thu., 1/28 (B: SEHS)-Fri., 1/29 (C: SHS)
Agenda:

  1. Homework review, Ch. 17 homework
  2. Group work on AD/AS posters
  3. Group presentations of AD/AS posters
  4. Introduction to New Classical aggregate supply

Homework due next class—Mon., 2/1 (A: 11A & SEHS)-Tue., 2/2 (B: 11B): Print out a recent news article about the tax and/or spending policies of two presidential candidates, preferably one Republican and one Democrat. Draw an AD/AS diagram and/or Lorenz curve illustrating the effect of at least one of the candidates’ policies. (10 points)

Diplomacy Simulation

HIST: Thu., 1/28 (B: SHS)-Fri., 1/29 (C: SEHS)
Agenda:

  1. Introduction to Diplomacy simulation
  2. Diplomacy simulation
  3. Debrief

Homework due next class—Mon., 2/1 (A): Read pp. 841-845 in World History. (Section 1 of Chapter 29 and the first page of Section 2.) Create a Venn diagram to compare your experience in our simulation to the developments described in the text. What about our simulation was similar to how World War I started? What was different?

AD/AS Poster Work

ECON: Wed., 1/27 (A: 11A & SEHS)-Thu., 1/28 (B: 11B)
Agenda:

  1. Review homework: Workpoint 16.6
  2. Group work on AD/AS posters

Homework due next class—Thu., 1/28 (B: SEHS)-Fri., 1/29 (C: SHS): Read chapter 17 in textbook on aggregate supply. Draw a diagram to illustrate the goal of supply side policies. In complete sentences, explain whether business owners or ordinary workers would be more attracted to market oriented supply side polices. Give three examples to support your choice (5 pts.)

Democratic Reform and Activism

HIST: Wed., 1/27 (A)
Agenda:

  1. Debrief OPVL analysis of imperialism
  2. Geopolitical analysis tips: National, regional newspapers
  3. Stand-up activity: Democratic reform in Britain
  4. Connection to earlier developments: Mary Wollstonecraft, Industrial Revolution
  5. Homework discussion: Pankhurst, Dreyfus Affair, ect.

Homework due next class—Thu., 1/28 (B: SHS)-Fri., 1/29 (C: SEHS): None. Work on Geopolitical Analysis.

Intro to Aggregate Demand

ECON: Mon. 1/25 (B: SEHS)-Tue., 1/26 (C: SHS)
Agenda:

  1. Overview of IB review materials
  2. Introduction to Aggregate Demand
  3. Introduction to Aggregate Supply curves
  4. Introduce AD/AS posters

Homework due next class—Wed., 1/27 (A: 11A & SEHS)-Thu., 1/28 (B: 11B): Read chapter 16 in textbook on aggregate demand, complete student workpoint 16.6 on page 177 (5 pts.).

Imperialism and the Scramble for Africa

HIST: Mon., 1/25 (B: SHS)-Tue., 1/26 (C: SEHS)
Agenda:

  1. Think, pair, share: Yinka Shonibare MBE, The Scramble for Africa
  2. Discussion: Which European motive behind imperialism in Africa was most powerful: nationalism, religion, or economics?
    -Possible 2nd question: To what extent was the Industrial Revolution responsible for the colonization of Africa?
    -Europeans’ mistaken in belief in their own superiority
  1. OPVL analysis: Views of Imperialism, p. 785, sources A and B

Homework due next class—Wed., 1/27 (A): Please read Chapter XXVI, Section I “Democratic Reform and Activism” (pages 746-750) and take 1.5-2 pages of Cornell notes. At the top of your note sheet, write the following focus question:

“How successful were activists in expanding the rights of workers, women and minority groups during the 1800s?” (Focus on Great Britain, France and other parts of Europe mentioned in the chapter.)

Answer the focus question with a short paragraph using several examples at the end of your notes. (5 points.)

Income Distribution Wrap-Up, Intro to Business Cycle

ECON: Fri., 1/22 (A: 11A & SEHS)-Mon., 1/25 (B: 11B)
Agenda:

  1. Quiz on distribution of income
  2. Debrief quiz
  3. Introduction to the business cycle
  4. Pin the tail on the business cycle

Homework due next class—Mon. 1/25 (B: SEHS)-Tue., 1/26 (C: SHS): None for Econ. Work on topic discovery and exploratory questions for seminar. Explore this web site: http://inequality.is/real  on economic inequality (optional).

Presidential Candidates, 2016

HIST: Fri., 1/22 (A)
Agenda:

  1. Learning about the candidates activity/discussion
  2. Here is the link to access the New York Times candidate web page:
    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/us/elections/candidates-on-the-issues.html?_r=0

Homework due next class—Mon., 1/25 (B: SHS)-Tue., 1/26 (C: SEHS) Read pp. 770-778 in World History on imperialism and the scramble for Africa in World History and take 1.5-2 pages of Cornell notes. At the top of your note sheet, write the following focus question:

“Which European motive behind imperialism in Africa was most powerful: nationalism, religion, or economics?” Answer the focus question with a short paragraph using several examples at the end of your notes.

Income Distribution and Taxation

ECON: Wed. 1/20 (B: SEHS)-Thu., 1/21 (C: SHS):
Agenda:

  1. Class discussion: Pros and cons of Gini and Lorenz
  2. Homework review: Different kinds of taxation
  3. Video clip: Where the candidates stand on capital gains tax
  4. Warren Buffet/Ben Carson editorial analysis

Homework due next class—Fri., 1/22 (A: 11A & SEHS)-Mon., 1/25 (B: 11B): Prepare for quiz on the distribution of income, the Gini Coefficient, and the Lorenz curve (20 points, multiple choice).

The Rise of Nationalism

HIST: Wed., 1/20 (B:SHS)-Thu., 1/21 (C: SEHS)
Agenda:

  1. Class discussion of homework: Nationalism as unifying and disunifying force
  2. Discussion: Pros and cons
  3. “Nationalism then and now” classification activity
  4. Debrief “Nationalism then and now” classification activity

Homework due next class—Fri., 1/22 (A): None. Work on Geopolitical analysis, due Feb.4

Homework due Mon., 1/25 (B: SHS)-Tue., 1/26 (C: SEHS) Read pp. 770-778 in World History on imperialism and the scramble for Africa in World History and take 1.5-2 pages of Cornell notes. At the top of your note sheet, write the following focus question:

“Which European motive behind imperialism in Africa was most powerful: nationalism, religion, or economics?” Answer the focus question with a short paragraph using several examples at the end of your notes.